Most Used Travel Apps

We have been recently asked about what apps we are constantly using on the road. When we thought about it there are quite a lot that we are using everyday to make our lives easier or to save us money. So we thought we would pull them all together for you.

Wikicamps

Unsurprisingly our number one App is Wikicamps Australia. This app for the tiny price of $7.95 has saved us this hundreds of times over. Not only can you search for caravan parks, showgrounds and campsites, but you can also find portable (drinking) water and non-portable (shower/washing up) water, dump points, attractions, lookouts and parks just to name a few. The feature that we used the most within this app is the comments and costs. Users are able to make comments about the points of interest and also any costs associated. This has been really helpful in planning our budget, seeing if there are extra charges for kids, and deciding if the campsite will fit our big car and caravan. We can also plan our next steps and save favourites that other travellers have suggested. To us this app is indispensable and our life pretty much revolves around Wikicamps.

BOM – Bureau of Meteorology

Living an outdoor lifestyle has lead us to living by the weather. The most reliable app for this we have found is the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) Weather app. The app is similar to most weather apps in allowing us to see the current temperature, winds, and rain predictions. The predictions are 1 week in advance allowing us to plan our activities for the coming week. It has the radar and as they are the department that issues weather warning we receive these by notification first. This is super important to us to ensure we can pack away our awning and outdoor equipment before it is damaged in the wind or rain. 

Polarsteps – Travel Tracker

Polarsteps – Travel Tracker is an app that automatically tracks your route (even when out of phone service) and places that you visit along the way. By just carrying your phone in your pocket you will have a beautiful travel journal at the end.

How it works is that you create a trip (i.e. Tasmania from 2nd March to 20th June) and then once inside these dates the app starts recording your travels, locations and tracks the photos you take at these time intervals. I know a bit big brother, but the part we love is that we can share our personal link to our families, and at anytime they can see we are still ‘travelling’ and alive and well. As well as this they can see the photos and comments we upload.

Once you have time to sit down in internet service you click into the app and all your locations are uploaded into the tracker. Suggested stops are there for you to look at. You can add these in, or just select different spots and load your own stops along the way by choosing the timestamped dots on your route. You can attach photos, comments, and also landmarks/campsites/points of interest to each stop.

At the end of your trip you can order your beautiful travel journal including all your routes, comments, statistics and photos. It is printed on 200gsm paper and has pricing listed on the app inclusive of shipping depending on the number of pages in your book.

We love that with a little bit of work along the way we will end up with a beautiful journal to remember our travels forever.

Fuel Map Australia – by Wikicamps

Fuel Map Australia is another app that has saved us quite a bit of money. This is a great app and it allows us to;

  • Look up where the closest, or cheapest fuel station is to us
  • Allows us to find where certain brand fuel stations are for applicable discounts
  • Tracks our fuel ups including L/100km, km/L, km/$, $/100km, average distance and litres between fuel ups.
  • Accumulative distance, refills, litres and costs which is great when tracking or planning a trip.

Across our time in Tasmania we have saved ourselves money on most fuel ups by shopping around and planning our fuel. The prices in a small area can vary quite a lot.

There is a disclaimer to the app though. The data in the app on the prices is only as good as the users that are entering them. If people aren’t entering up to date prices, you might be basing your fuel ups on incorrect information. There is a timestamp on when prices were last entered so you can make an informed decision. To help this we always try to enter the prices into the app when we stop for fuel, so that they are accurate for the next person.

Geocaching

One of our newest pass times since hitting the road is Geocaching. For those who don’t know what it is there is basically millions of various sized containers hidden all around the world, and this app lists them all. We as geocachers then head out to find them based on the coordinates and clues that have been placed into the app.

There are different levels of access within the app. There is the free version of the app where you just download it, create an account and off you go. The only thing we have found with the free version is that there are all the caches/containers that we couldn’t access without a subscription. This became quite frustrating for us as you can see them on the app, but not access the clues or log them.

After about 2 months on the road we assessed that the geocaching is something that the kids and us adults quite enjoyed, and as a bonus it was taking us to many places we wouldn’t have normally gone and we were learning so much more about this country that we wouldn’t have otherwise. We then looked into the subscription and for $38.71 per year we could access all the caches within the app. For us travelling full time was a no brainer.

One of the things we love most is the caches that are created by passionate cachers is that they include an abundance of history and information about the locations that the cache is hidden. Often we will read the information to the kids in the car or on the walk to the cache’s. This is increasing all of our knowledge of this beautiful country, and we recon that is worth the $38 a year.

Fishing

Being the fishing loving family that we are, Australian Tides (Au Tides) and TasFish Guide have become our two favorite free fishing apps. The Au Tides app has taken all the guess work out of reading the tides for us. The app automatically picks up our location from your mobile phone and selects the closest tide location. It has allowed us to plan our fishing trips in locations that we are unfamiliar with, and make sure that when we turn up we aren’t greeted with a sandflat instead of water!

Although the TasFish Guide is Tasmania specific most of the other states have similar apps (FishSmart NSW, QLD Fishing, NT Fishing Mate, Vic Fishing, SA Recreational Fishing Guide, RecFishWest). The apps outline the fishing rules for each specific state, most including regulations, licences, size and bag limits as well as photos of the fish so you can identify them. Seeing as we have just ventured into the world of spearfishing, this app as been so helpful in identifying the fish before we catch them.

In summary there are so many apps out there these days that you need to work out what ones are useful to you and your travel style. But for us the ones above have been indespensable and have saved us so much money and time along the way.

Got any questions . . . hit us up below.

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